Innovative lessons for key K-8 math concepts and skills

Adopted in 2014, the Indiana Academic Standards for Mathematics demonstrate what students should know and be able to do in the areas of K-8 Mathematics; Algebra I, II, and Geometry; and higher-level high school mathematics courses. Understanding of mathematics provides vital content and skills for lifelong learning and problem solving in our increasingly complex technological world and engages students in the essential thinking skills and processes used across subject areas. DreamBox lessons and reports are aligned to show progress toward IASM standards.  You can track progress with Insight Reports that surface student performance by each standard and even create personalized assignments aligned with specific Indiana standards.

Lessons by Standards

RegionStandardDescriptionLevel
IndianaAI.DS.2Graph bivariate data on a scatter plot and describe the relationship between the variables.Algebra
IndianaAI.DS.3Use technology to find a linear function that models a relationship for a bivariate data set to make predictions; interpret the slope and y-intercept, and compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient.Algebra
IndianaAI.F.2Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear, has a maximum or minimum value). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been verbally described. Identify independent and dependent variables and make predictions about the relationship.Algebra
IndianaAI.F.4Understand and interpret statements that use function notation in terms of a context; relate the domain of the function to its graph and to the quantitative relationship it describes.Algebra
IndianaAI.QE.3Graph exponential and quadratic equations in two variables with and without technology.Algebra
IndianaAI.QE.5Represent real-world problems using quadratic equations in one or two variables and solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.Algebra
IndianaAI.QE.7Describe the relationships among the solutions of a quadratic equation, the zeros of the function, the x-intercepts of the graph, and the factors of the expression.Algebra
IndianaAI.RNE.6Factor common terms from polynomials and factor polynomials completely. Factor the difference of two squares, perfect square trinomials, and other quadratic expressions.Algebra
IndianaAI.SEI.3Write a system of two linear equations in two variables that represents a real-world problem and solve the problem with and without technology. Interpret the solution and determine whether the solution is reasonable.Algebra
IndianaAII.CNE.4Rewrite algebraic rational expressions in equivalent forms (e.g., using laws of exponents and factoring techniques).Algebra II
IndianaAII.DSP.2Use technology to find a linear, quadratic, or exponential function that models a relationship for a bivariate data set to make predictions; compute (using technology) and interpret the correlation coefficient.Algebra II
IndianaAII.EL.2Graph exponential functions with and without technology. Identify and describe features, such as intercepts, zeros, domain and range, and asymptotic and end behavior.Algebra II
IndianaAII.EL.4Use the properties of exponents to transform expressions for exponential functions (e.g., the express ion 1.15^t can be rewritten as (1.15^1/12)^12t ? 1.012^12t to reveal the approximate equivalent monthly interest rate if the annual rate is 15%)Algebra II
IndianaAII.EL.7Represent real-world problems using exponential equations in one or two variables and solve such problems with and without technology. Interpret the solutions and determine whether they are reasonable.Algebra II
IndianaAII.F.2Understand composition of functions and combine functions by composition.Algebra II
IndianaAII.PR.2Graph relations and functions including polynomial, square root, and piecewise-defined functions (including step functions and absolute value functions) with and without technology. Identify and describe features, such as intercepts, zeros, domain and range, end behavior, and lines of symmetry.Algebra II
IndianaAII.Q.2Use completing the square to rewrite quadratic functions into the form y = a(x + h)^2 + k, and graph these functions with and without technology. Identify intercepts, zeros, domain and range, and lines of symmetry. Understand the relationship between completing the square and the quadratic formula.Algebra II
Indiana1.CA.1Demonstrate fluency with addition facts and the corresponding subtraction facts within 20. Use strategies such as counting on; making ten (e.g., 8 + 6 = 8 + 2 + 4 = 10 + 4 = 14); decomposing a number leading to a ten (e.g., 13 - 4 = 13 - 3 - 1 = 10 - 1 = 9); using the relationship between addition and subtraction (e.g., knowing that 8 + 4 = 12, one knows 12 - 8 = 4); and creating equivalent but easier or known sums (e.g., adding 6 + 7 by creating the known equivalent 6 + 6 + 1 = 12 + 1 = 13). Understand the role of 0 in addition and subtraction.Grade 1
Indiana1.CA.5Add within 100, including adding a two-digit number and a one-digit number, and adding a two-digit number and a multiple of 10, using models or drawings and strategies based on place value, properties of operations, and/or the relationship between addition and subtraction; describe the strategy and explain the reasoning used. Understand that in adding two-digit numbers, one adds tens and tens, ones and ones, and that sometimes it is necessary to compose a ten.Grade 1
Indiana1.CA.6Understand the meaning of the equal sign, and determine if equations involving addition and subtraction are true or false (e.g., Which of the following equations are true and which are false? 6 = 6, 7 = 8 - 1, 5 + 2 = 2 + 5, 4 + 1 = 5 + 2).Grade 1
Indiana1.DA.1Organize and interpret data with up to three choices (What is your favorite fruit? apples, bananas, oranges); ask and answer questions about the total number of data points, how many in each choice, and how many more or less in one choice compared to another.Grade 1
Indiana1.M.2Tell and write time to the nearest half-hour and relate time to events (before/after, shorter/longer) using analog clocks. Understand how to read hours and minutes using digital clocks.Grade 1
Indiana1.NS.1Count to at least 120 by ones, fives, and tens from any given number. In this range, read and write numerals and represent a number of objects with a written numeral.Grade 1
Indiana1.NS.2Understand that 10 can be thought of as a group of ten ones - called a "ten." Understand that the numbers from 11 to 19 are composed of a ten and one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine ones. Understand that the numbers 10, 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 70, 80, 90 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine tens (and 0 ones).Grade 1
Indiana1.NS.4Use place value understanding to compare two two-digit numbers based on meanings of the tens and ones digits, recording the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, and <.Grade 1
Indiana1.NS.5Find mentally 10 more or 10 less than a given two-digit the number without having to count, and explain the thinking process used to get the answer.Grade 1
Indiana2.CA.1Add and subtract fluently within 100.Grade 2
Indiana2.CA.2Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction within 100 in situations of adding to, taking from, putting together, taking apart, and comparing, with unknowns in all parts of the addition or subtraction problem (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem). Use estimation to decide whether answers are reasonable in addition problems.Grade 2
Indiana2.DA.1Draw a picture graph (with single-unit scale) and a bar graph (with single-unit scale) to represent a data set with up to four choices (What is your favorite color? red, blue, yellow, green). Solve simple put-together, take-apart, and compare problems using information presented in the graphs.Grade 2
Indiana2.G.1Identify, describe, and classify two- and three-dimensional shapes (triangle, square, rectangle, cube, right rectangular prism) according to the number and shape of faces and the number of sides and/or vertices. Draw two-dimensional shapes.Grade 2
Indiana2.G.2Create squares, rectangles, triangles, cubes, and right rectangular prisms using appropriate materials.Grade 2
Indiana2.M.2Estimate and measure the length of an object by selecting and using appropriate tools, such as rulers, yardsticks, meter sticks, and measuring tapes to the nearest inch, foot, yard, centimeter and meter.Grade 2
Indiana2.M.5Tell and write time to the nearest five minutes from analog clocks, using a.m. and p.m. Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals on the hour or half hour.Grade 2
Indiana2.NS.1Count by ones, twos, fives, tens, and hundreds up to at least 1,000 from any given number.Grade 2
Indiana2.NS.2Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000. Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole numbers up to 1,000.Grade 2
Indiana2.NS.6Understand that the three digits of a three-digit number represent amounts of hundreds, tens, and ones (e.g., 706 equals 7 hundreds, 0 tens, and 6 ones). Understand that 100 can be thought of as a group of ten tens - called a "hundred." Understand that the numbers 100, 200, 300, 400, 500, 600, 700, 800, 900 refer to one, two, three, four, five, six, seven, eight, or nine hundreds (and 0 tens and 0 ones).Grade 2
Indiana2.NS.7Use place value understanding to compare two three-digit numbers based on meanings of the hundreds, tens, and ones digits, using >, =, and < symbols to record the results of comparisons.Grade 2
Indiana3.AT.1Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of whole numbers within 1000 (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem).Grade 3
Indiana3.AT.2Solve real-world problems involving whole number multiplication and division within 100 in situations involving equal groups, arrays, and measurement quantities (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem).Grade 3
Indiana3.AT.4Interpret a multiplication equation as equal groups (e.g., interpret 5 x 7 as the total number of objects in 5 groups of 7 objects each). Represent verbal statements of equal groups as multiplication equations.Grade 3
Indiana3.AT.5Determine the unknown whole number in a multiplication or division equation relating three whole numbers.Grade 3
Indiana3.C.1Add and subtract whole numbers fluently within 1000.Grade 3
Indiana3.C.3Represent the concept of division of whole numbers with the following models: partitioning, sharing, and an inverse of multiplication. Understand the properties of 0 and 1 in division.Grade 3
Indiana3.C.4Interpret whole-number quotients of whole numbers (e.g., interpret 56 divided by 8 as the number of objects in each share when 56 objects are partitioned equally into 8 shares, or as a number of shares when 56 objects are partitioned into equal shares of 8 objects each).Grade 3
Indiana3.C.5Multiply and divide within 100 using strategies, such as the relationship between multiplication and division (e.g., knowing that 8 x 5 = 40, one knows 40 divided by 5 = 8), or properties of operations.Grade 3
Indiana3.DA.1Create scaled picture graphs, scaled bar graphs, and frequency tables to represent a data set-including data collected through observations, surveys, and experiments-with several categories. Solve one- and two-step 'how many more' and 'how many less' problems regarding the data and make predictions based on the data.Grade 3
Indiana3.DA.2Generate measurement data by measuring lengths with rulers to the nearest quarter of an inch. Display the data by making a line plot, where the horizontal scale is marked off in appropriate units, such as whole numbers, halves, or quarters.Grade 3
Indiana3.G.2Understand that shapes (e.g., rhombuses, rectangles, and others) may share attributes (e.g., having four sides), and that the shared attributes can define a larger category (e.g., quadrilaterals). Recognize and draw rhombuses, rectangles, and squares as examples of quadrilaterals. Recognize and draw examples of quadrilaterals that do not belong to any of these subcategories.Grade 3
Indiana3.M.3Tell and write time to the nearest minute from analog clocks, using a.m. and p.m., and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes.Grade 3
Indiana3.M.5Find the area of a rectangle with whole-number side lengths by modeling with unit squares, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Identify and draw rectangles with the same perimeter and different areas or with the same area and different perimeters.Grade 3
Indiana3.M.6Multiply side lengths to find areas of rectangles with whole-number side lengths to solve real-world problems and other mathematical problems, and represent whole-number products as rectangular areas in mathematical reasoning.Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.3Understand a fraction, 1/b, as the quantity formed by 1 part when a whole is partitioned into b equal parts; understand a fraction, a/b, as the quantity formed by a parts of size 1/b.Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.4Represent a fraction, 1/b, on a number line by defining the interval from 0 to 1 as the whole, and partitioning it into b equal parts. Recognize that each part has size 1/b and that the endpoint of the part based at 0 locates the number 1/b on the number line.Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.5Represent a fraction, a/b, on a number line by marking off lengths 1/b from 0. Recognize that the resulting interval has size a/b, and that its endpoint locates the number a/b on the number line.Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.6Understand two fractions as equivalent (equal) if they are the same size, based on the same whole or the same point on a number line.Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.7Recognize and generate simple equivalent fractions (e.g., 1/2 = 2/4, 4/6 = 2/3). Explain why the fractions are equivalent (e.g., by using a visual fraction model).Grade 3
Indiana3.NS.8Compare two fractions with the same numerator or the same denominator by reasoning about their size based on the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, orGrade 3
Indiana3.NS.9Use place value understanding to round 2- and 3-digit whole numbers to the nearest 10 or 100.Grade 3
Indiana4.AT.3Interpret a multiplication equation as a comparison (e.g., interpret 35 = 5 x 7 as a statement that 35 is 5 times as many as 7, and 7 times as many as 5). Represent verbal statements of multiplicative comparisons as multiplication equations.Grade 4
Indiana4.AT.4Solve real-world problems with whole numbers involving multiplicative comparison (e.g., by using drawings and equations with a symbol for the unknown number to represent the problem), distinguishing multiplicative comparison from additive comparison.Grade 4
Indiana4.AT.5Solve real-world problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions referring to the same whole and having common denominators (e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem).Grade 4
Indiana4.AT.6Understand that an equation, such as y = 3x + 5, is a rule to describe a relationship between two variables and can be used to find a second number when a first number is given. Generate a number pattern that follows a given rule.Grade 4
Indiana4.C.1Add and subtract multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.Grade 4
Indiana4.C.2Multiply a whole number of up to four digits by a one-digit whole number and multiply two two-digit numbers, using strategies based on place value and the properties of operations. Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning.Grade 4
Indiana4.C.3Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and one-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning.Grade 4
Indiana4.C.5Add and subtract fractions with common denominators. Decompose a fraction into a sum of fractions with common denominators. Understand addition and subtraction of fractions as combining and separating parts referring to the same whole.Grade 4
Indiana4.C.6Add and subtract mixed numbers with common denominators (e.g. by replacing each mixed number with an equivalent fraction and/or by using properties of operations and the relationship between addition and subtraction).Grade 4
Indiana4.DA.2Make a line plot to display a data set of measurements in fractions of a unit (1/2, 1/4, 1/8). Solve problems involving addition and subtraction of fractions by using data displayed in line plots.Grade 4
Indiana4.G.4Identify, describe, and draw rays, angles (right, acute, obtuse), and perpendicular and parallel lines using appropriate tools (e.g., ruler, straightedge and technology). Identify these in two-dimensional figures.Grade 4
Indiana4.G.5Classify triangles and quadrilaterals based on the presence or absence of parallel or perpendicular lines, or the presence or absence of angles (right, acute, obtuse).Grade 4
Indiana4.M.2Know relative sizes of measurement units within one system of units, including km, m, cm; kg, g; lb, oz; l, ml; hr, min, sec. Express measurements in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit within a single system of measurement. Record measurement equivalents in a two-column table.Grade 4
Indiana4.M.3Use the four operations (addition, subtraction, multiplication and division) to solve real-world problems involving distances, intervals of time, volumes, masses of objects, and money. Include addition and subtraction problems involving simple fractions and problems that require expressing measurements given in a larger unit in terms of a smaller unit.Grade 4
Indiana4.M.4Apply the area and perimeter formulas for rectangles to solve real-world problems and other mathematical problems. Recognize area as additive and find the area of complex shapes composed of rectangles by decomposing them into non-overlapping rectangles and adding the areas of the non-overlapping parts; apply this technique to solve real-world problems and other mathematical problems.Grade 4
Indiana4.M.5Understand that an angle is measured with reference to a circle, with its center at the common endpoint of the rays, by considering the fraction of the circular arc between the points where the two rays intersect the circle. Understand an angle that turns through 1/360 of a circle is called a "one-degree angle", and can be used to measure other angles. Understand an angle that turns through n one-degree angles is said to have an angle measure of n degrees.Grade 4
Indiana4.M.6Measure angles in whole-number degrees using appropriate tools. Sketch angles of specified measure.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.1Read and write whole numbers up to 1,000,000. Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent and show equivalent forms of whole numbers up to 1,000,000.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.2Compare two whole numbers up to 1,000,000 using >, =, and < symbols.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.3Express whole numbers as fractions and recognize fractions that are equivalent to whole numbers. Name and write mixed numbers using objects or pictures. Name and write mixed numbers as improper fractions using objects or pictures.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.4Explain why a fraction, a/b, is equivalent to a fraction, (n x a)/(n x b), by using visual fraction models, with attention to how the number and size of the parts differ even though the two fractions themselves are the same size. Use the principle to recognize and generate equivalent fractions.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.5Compare two fractions with different numerators and different denominators (e.g., by creating common denominators or numerators, or by comparing to a benchmark, such as 0, 1/2, and 1). Recognize comparisons are valid only when the two fractions refer to the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with symbols >, =, orGrade 4
Indiana4.NS.6Write tenths and hundredths in decimal and fraction notations. Use words, models, standard form and expanded form to represent decimal numbers to hundredths. Know the fraction and decimal equivalents for halves and fourths (e.g., 1/2 = 0.5 = 0.50, 7/4 = 1 3/4 = 1.75).Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.7Compare two decimals to hundredths by reasoning about their size based on the same whole. Record the results of comparisons with the symbols >, =, orGrade 4
Indiana4.NS.8Find all factor pairs for a whole number in the range 1-100. Recognize that a whole number is a multiple of each of its factors. Determine whether a given whole number in the range 1-100 is a multiple of a given one-digit number.Grade 4
Indiana4.NS.9Use place value understanding to round multi-digit whole numbers to any given place value.Grade 4
Indiana5.AT.3Solve real-world problems involving multiplication of fractions, including mixed numbers (e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem).Grade 5
Indiana5.AT.4Solve real-world problems involving division of unit fractions by non-zero whole numbers, and division of whole numbers by unit fractions (e.g., by using visual fraction models and equations to represent the problem).Grade 5
Indiana5.AT.6Graph points with whole number coordinates on a coordinate plane. Explain how the coordinates relate the point as the distance from the origin on each axis, with the convention that the names of the two axes and the coordinates correspond (e.g., x-axis and x-coordinate, y-axis and y-coordinate).Grade 5
Indiana5.AT.7Represent real-world problems and equations by graphing ordered pairs in the first quadrant of the coordinate plane, and interpret coordinate values of points in the context of the situation.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.1Multiply multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.2Find whole-number quotients and remainders with up to four-digit dividends and two-digit divisors, using strategies based on place value, the properties of operations, and/or the relationship between multiplication and division. Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning used.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.3Compare the size of a product to the size of one factor on the basis of the size of the other factor, without performing the indicated multiplication.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.5Use visual fraction models and numbers to multiply a fraction by a fraction or a whole number.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.6Explain why multiplying a positive number by a fraction greater than 1 results in a product greater than the given number. Explain why multiplying a positive number by a fraction less than 1 results in a product smaller than the given number. Relate the principle of fraction equivalence, a/b = (n x a)/(n x b), to the effect of multiplying a/b by 1.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.7Use visual fraction models and numbers to divide a unit fraction by a non-zero whole number and to divide a whole number by a unit fraction.Grade 5
Indiana5.C.8Add, subtract, multiply, and divide decimals to hundredths, using models or drawings and strategies based on place value or the properties of operations. Describe the strategy and explain the reasoning.Grade 5
Indiana5.G.2Identify and classify polygons including quadrilaterals, pentagons, hexagons, and triangles (equilateral, isosceles, scalene, right, acute and obtuse) based on angle measures and sides. Classify polygons in a hierarchy based on properties.Grade 5
Indiana5.M.2Find the area of a rectangle with fractional side lengths by modeling with unit squares of the appropriate unit fraction side lengths, and show that the area is the same as would be found by multiplying the side lengths. Multiply fractional side lengths to find areas of rectangles, and represent fraction products as rectangular areas.Grade 5
Indiana5.NS.1Use a number line to compare and order fractions, mixed numbers, and decimals to thousandths. Write the results using >, =, and < symbols.Grade 5
Indiana5.NS.2Explain different interpretations of fractions, including: as parts of a whole, parts of a set, and division of whole numbers by whole numbers.Grade 5
Indiana5.NS.3Recognize the relationship that in a multi-digit number, a digit in one place represents 10 times as much as it represents in the place to its right, and inversely, a digit in one place represents 1/10 of what it represents in the place to its left.Grade 5
Indiana5.NS.4Explain patterns in the number of zeros of the product when multiplying a number by powers of 10, and explain patterns in the placement of the decimal point when a decimal is multiplied or divided by a power of 10. Use whole-number exponents to denote powers of 10.Grade 5
Indiana5.NS.6Understand, interpret, and model percents as part of a hundred (e.g. by using pictures, diagrams, and other visual models).Grade 5
Indiana6.AF.1Evaluate expressions for specific values of their variables, including expressions with whole-number exponents and those that arise from formulas used in real-world problems.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.2Apply the properties of operations (e.g., identity, inverse, commutative, associative, distributive properties) to create equivalent linear expressions and to justify whether two linear expressions are equivalent when the two expressions name the same number regardless of which value is substituted into them.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.3Define and use multiple variables when writing expressions to represent real-world and other mathematical problems, and evaluate them for given values.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.4Understand that solving an equation or inequality is the process of answering the following question: Which values from a specified set, if any, make the equation or inequality true? Use substitution to determine whether a given number in a specified set makes an equation or inequality true.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.5Solve equations of the form x + p = q, x ? p = q, px = q, and x/p = q fluently for cases in which p, q and x are all nonnegative rational numbers. Represent real world problems using equations of these forms and solve such problems.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.6Write an inequality of the form x > c, x ? c, x < c, or x ? c, where c is a rational number, to represent a constraint or condition in a real-world or other mathematical problem. Recognize inequalities have infinitely many solutions and represent solutions on a number line diagram.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.7Understand that signs of numbers in ordered pairs indicate the quadrant containing the point; recognize that when two ordered pairs differ only by signs, the locations of the points are related by reflections across one or both axes. Graph points with rational number coordinates on a coordinate plane.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.8Solve real-world and other mathematical problems by graphing points with rational number coordinates on a coordinate plane. Include the use of coordinates and absolute value to find distances between points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate.Grade 6
Indiana6.AF.9Make tables of equivalent ratios relating quantities with whole-number measurements, find missing values in the tables, and plot the pairs of values on the coordinate plane.Grade 6
Indiana6.C.1Divide multi-digit whole numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.Grade 6
Indiana6.C.2Compute with positive fractions and positive decimals fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.Grade 6
Indiana6.C.4Compute quotients of positive fractions and solve real-world problems involving division of fractions by fractions. Use a visual fraction model and/or equation to represent these calculations.Grade 6
Indiana6.C.6Apply the order of operations and properties of operations (identity, inverse, commutative properties of addition and multiplication, associative properties of addition and multiplication, and distributive property) to evaluate numerical expressions with nonnegative rational numbers, including those using grouping symbols, such as parentheses, and involving whole number exponents. Justify each step in the process.Grade 6
Indiana6.GM.1Convert between measurement systems (English to metric and metric to English) given conversion factors, and use these conversions in solving real-world problems.Grade 6
Indiana6.GM.3Draw polygons in the coordinate plane given coordinates for the vertices; use coordinates to find the length of a side joining points with the same first coordinate or the same second coordinate; apply these techniques to solve real-world and other mathematical problems.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.1Understand that positive and negative numbers are used to describe quantities having opposite directions or values (e.g., temperature above/below zero, elevation above/below sea level, credits/debits, positive/negative electric charge). Use positive and negative numbers to represent and compare quantities in real-world contexts, explaining the meaning of 0 in each situation.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.10Use reasoning involving rates and ratios to model real-world and other mathematical problems (e.g., by reasoning about tables of equivalent ratios, tape diagrams, double number line diagrams, or equations).Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.2Understand the integer number system. Recognize opposite signs of numbers as indicating locations on opposite sides of 0 on the number line; recognize that the opposite of the opposite of a number is the number itself (e.g., -(-3) = 3), and that 0 is its own opposite.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.3Compare and order rational numbers and plot them on a number line. Write, interpret, and explain statements of order for rational numbers in real-world contexts.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.4Understand that the absolute value of a number is the distance from zero on a number line. Find the absolute value of real numbers and know that the distance between two numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference. Interpret absolute value as magnitude for a positive or negative quantity in a real-world situation.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.8Interpret, model, and use ratios to show the relative sizes of two quantities. Describe how a ratio shows the relationship between two quantities. Use the following notations: a/b, a to b, a:b.Grade 6
Indiana6.NS.9Understand the concept of a unit rate and use terms related to rate in the context of a ratio relationship.Grade 6
Indiana7.AF.1Apply the properties of operations (e.g., identity, inverse, commutative, associative, distributive properties) to create equivalent linear expressions, including situations that involve factoring (e.g., given 2x - 10, create an equivalent expression 2(x - 5)). Justify each step in the process.Grade 7
Indiana7.AF.6Decide whether two quantities are in a proportional relationship (e.g., by testing for equivalent ratios in a table or graphing on a coordinate plane and observing whether the graph is a straight line through the origin).Grade 7
Indiana7.AF.7Identify the unit rate or constant of proportionality in tables, graphs, equations, and verbal descriptions of proportional relationships.Grade 7
Indiana7.AF.8Explain what the coordinates of a point on the graph of a proportional relationship mean in terms of the situation, with special attention to the points (0,0) and (1,r), where r is the unit rate.Grade 7
Indiana7.AF.9Identify real-world and other mathematical situations that involve proportional relationships. Write equations and draw graphs to represent proportional relationships and recognize that these situations are described by a linear function in the form y = mx, where the unit rate, m, is the slope of the line.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.1Understand p + q as the number located a distance |q| from p, in the positive or negative direction, depending on whether q is positive or negative. Show that a number and its opposite have a sum of 0 (are additive inverses). Interpret sums of rational numbers by describing real-world contexts.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.2Understand subtraction of rational numbers as adding the additive inverse, p - q = p + (-q). Show that the distance between two rational numbers on the number line is the absolute value of their difference, and apply this principle in real-world contexts.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.3Understand that multiplication is extended from fractions to rational numbers by requiring that operations continue to satisfy the properties of operations, particularly the distributive property, leading to products such as (-1)(-1) = 1 and the rules for multiplying signed numbers.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.4Understand that integers can be divided, provided that the divisor is not zero, and that every quotient of integers (with non-zero divisor) is a rational number. Understand that if p and q are integers, then -(p/q) = (-p)/q = p/(-q).Grade 7
Indiana7.C.5Compute unit rates associated with ratios of fractions, including ratios of lengths, areas and other quantities measured in like or different units.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.6Use proportional relationships to solve ratio and percent problems with multiple operations, such as the following: simple interest, tax, markups, markdowns, gratuities, commissions, fees, conversions within and across measurement systems, percent increase and decrease, and percent error.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.7Compute with rational numbers fluently using a standard algorithmic approach.Grade 7
Indiana7.C.8Solve real-world problems with rational numbers by using one or two operations.Grade 7
Indiana7.GM.1Draw triangles (freehand, with ruler and protractor, and using technology) with given conditions from three measures of angles or sides, and notice when the conditions determine a unique triangle, more than one triangle, or no triangle.Grade 7
Indiana7.GM.3Solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving scale drawings of geometric figures, including computing actual lengths and areas from a scale drawing. Create a scale drawing by using proportional reasoning.Grade 7
Indiana7.GM.4Solve real-world and other mathematical problems that involve vertical, adjacent, complementary, and supplementary angles.Grade 7
Indiana8.AF.1Solve linear equations with rational number coefficients fluently, including equations whose solutions require expanding expressions using the distributive property and collecting like terms. Represent real-world problems using linear equations and inequalities in one variable and solve such problems.Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.2Give examples of linear equations in one variable with one solution, infinitely many solutions, or no solutions. Show which of these possibilities is the case by transforming a given equation into simpler forms, until an equivalent equation of the form x = a, a = a, or a = b results (where a and b are different numbers).Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.3Understand that a function assigns to each x-value (independent variable) exactly one y-value (dependent variable), and that the graph of a function is the set of ordered pairs (x,y).Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.4Describe qualitatively the functional relationship between two quantities by analyzing a graph (e.g., where the function is increasing or decreasing, linear or nonlinear, has a maximum or minimum value). Sketch a graph that exhibits the qualitative features of a function that has been verbally described.Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.5Interpret the equation y = mx + b as defining a linear function, whose graph is a straight line; give examples of functions that are not linear. Describe similarities and differences between linear and nonlinear functions from tables, graphs, verbal descriptions, and equations.Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.6Construct a function to model a linear relationship between two quantities given a verbal description, table of values, or graph. Recognize in y = mx + b that m is the slope (rate of change) and b is the y-intercept of the graph, and describe the meaning of each in the context of a problem.Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.7Compare properties of two linear functions given in different forms, such as a table of values, equation, verbal description, and graph (e.g., compare a distance-time graph to a distance-time equation to determine which of two moving objects has greater speed).Grade 8
Indiana8.AF.8Understand that solutions to a system of two linear equations correspond to points of intersection of their graphs because points of intersection satisfy both equations simultaneously. Approximate the solution of a system of equations by graphing and interpreting the reasonableness of the approximation.Grade 8
Indiana8.C.2Solve real-world and other mathematical problems involving numbers expressed in scientific notation, including problems where both decimal and scientific notation are used. Interpret scientific notation that has been generated by technology, such as a scientific calculator, graphing calculator, or excel spreadsheet.Grade 8
Indiana8.DSP.1Construct and interpret scatter plots for bivariate measurement data to investigate patterns of association between two quantitative variables. Describe patterns such as clustering, outliers, positive or negative association, linear association, and nonlinear association.Grade 8
Indiana8.DSP.2Know that straight lines are widely used to model relationships between two quantitative variables. For scatter plots that suggest a linear association, informally fit a straight line, and describe the model fit by judging the closeness of the data points to the line.Grade 8
Indiana8.GM.3Verify experimentally the properties of rotations, reflections, and translations, including: lines are mapped to lines, and line segments to line segments of the same length; angles are mapped to angles of the same measure; and parallel lines are mapped to parallel lines.Grade 8
Indiana8.GM.4Understand that a two-dimensional figure is congruent to another if the second can be obtained from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, and translations. Describe a sequence that exhibits the congruence between two given congruent figures.Grade 8
Indiana8.GM.5Understand that a two-dimensional figure is similar to another if the second can be obtained from the first by a sequence of rotations, reflections, translations, and dilations. Describe a sequence that exhibits the similarity between two given similar figures.Grade 8
Indiana8.GM.8Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to determine unknown side lengths in right triangles in real-world and other mathematical problems in two dimensions.Grade 8
Indiana8.GM.9Apply the Pythagorean Theorem to find the distance between two points in a coordinate plane.Grade 8
Indiana8.NS.1Give examples of rational and irrational numbers and explain the difference between them. Understand that every number has a decimal expansion; for rational numbers, show that the decimal expansion terminates or repeats, and convert a decimal expansion that repeats into a rational number.Grade 8
IndianaK.CA.1Use objects, drawings, mental images, sounds, etc., to represent addition and subtraction within 10.Kindergarten
IndianaK.CA.2Solve real-world problems that involve addition and subtraction within 10 (e.g., by using objects or drawings to represent the problem).Kindergarten
IndianaK.CA.3Use objects, drawings, etc., to decompose numbers less than or equal to 10 into pairs in more than one way, and record each decomposition with a drawing or an equation (e.g., 5 = 2 + 3 and 5 = 4 + 1).Kindergarten
IndianaK.CA.4Find the number that makes 10 when added to the given number for any number from 1 to 9 (e.g., by using objects or drawings), and record the answer with a drawing or an equation.Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.1Count to at least 100 by ones and tens and count on by one from any number.Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.2Write whole numbers from 0 to 20 and recognize number words from 0 to 10. Represent a number of objects with a written numeral 0-20 (with 0 representing a count of no objects).Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.4Say the number names in standard order when counting objects, pairing each object with one and only one number name and each number name with one and only one object. Understand that the last number name said describes the number of objects counted and that the number of objects is the same regardless of their arrangement or the order in which they were counted.Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.5Count up to 20 objects arranged in a line, a rectangular array, or a circle. Count up to 10 objects in a scattered configuration. Count out the number of objects, given a number from 1 to 20.Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.7Identify whether the number of objects in one group is greater than, less than, or equal to the number of objects in another group (e.g., by using matching and counting strategies).Kindergarten
IndianaK.NS.8Compare the values of two numbers from 1 to 20 presented as written numerals.Kindergarten
IndianaPC.EL.3Graph and solve real-world and other mathematical problems that can be modeled using exponential and logarithmic equations and inequalities; interpret the solution and determine whether it is reasonable.Pre-Calculus
IndianaPC.F.1For a function that models a relationship between two quantities, interpret key features of graphs and tables in terms of the quantities, and sketch graphs showing key features given a verbal description of the relationship. Key features include: intercepts; intervals where the function is increasing, decreasing, positive, or negative; relative maximums and minimums; symmetries; end behavior; and periodicity.Pre-Calculus
IndianaPC.F.8Define arithmetic and geometric sequences recursively. Use a variety of recursion equations to describe a function. Model and solve word problems involving applications of sequences and series, interpret the solutions and determine whether the solutions are reasonable.Pre-Calculus
IndianaPC.QPR.2Graph rational functions with and without technology. Identify and describe features such as intercepts, domain and range, and asymptotic and end behavior.Pre-Calculus
IndianaPS.DA.11Find linear models by using median fit and least squares regression methods to make predictions. Decide which among several linear models gives a better fit. Interpret the slope and intercept in terms of the original context. Informally assess the fit of a function by plotting and analyzing residuals.Probability and Statistics
IndianaTR.PF.2Graph trigonometric functions with and without technology. Use the graphs to model and analyze periodic phenomena, stating amplitude, period, frequency, phase shift, and midline (vertical shift).Trigonometry